Two Reasons Why We Hate Mondays

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Weekends are a great time to step away from the pressures of work, spend some quality time with your family and loved ones and recover physically and mentally from the previous work week. 

But, as the weekend gets to an end (i.e., Sunday evening), we all start thinking about Monday. Of all the days of the work week, Monday is often considered to be the worse one. Why?

Why are Mondays so difficult? 


I don't know you, but unless I am scheduled to teach classes on Monday or have a meeting, I am usually not mentally prepared for Monday. I always feel that I am never well organized or ready for Mondays. Of course, I am the first one to admit that I need to change something, so I am more productive on Mondays, at least for part of the day!

Well, I did a little bit of research about this topic and found that there are various reasons why we hate Mondays and are often not prepared for it. Out of all the different reasons that have been suggested or proposed, two are particularly interesting and somehow controversial.

2 reasons why we hate Mondays


1. Sleep patterns.  Since most people don’t get enough sleep during the week, they often try to make up for it on weekends. Flinders University sleep expert Leon Lack said that "extra sleep just makes you more tired at the start of the week". According to this expert, an extra two hours of sleep during the weekend can delay your body by up to 45 minutes, making harder to get up on a Monday morning. 

So, if I understand this expert correctly, we should not change too much our sleep patterns during the weekend. One or two extra hours of sleep can have significant effects on our emotions and attitude on Monday morning because if we sleep too much during the weekend we modify significantly our biological clock. It may explain why we may feel so tired on Monday morning.



2. Sudden changeThinking that Monday is the worst day of the week may only demonstrate that there is a larger emotional shift from Sunday (a happy weekend day) to Monday (a work day) than there is between two work days. This is based on an analysis conducted by Dr. Arthur Stone (Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science at Stony Brook University) and two of his colleagues.

These scientists examined data from a yearlong survey conducted by Gallup Organization. In this survey, people were asked to recall their mood in the prior day. Mood was evaluated with several adjectives measuring positive and negative feelings. Surprisingly, the data clearly showed that Mondays are not more stressful or depressing than other work days, except for Friday. The authors of this study suggested that the negative feelings that we have for Mondays may simply highlight the fact that "beliefs or judgments about an experience can be at odds with the actual experience".


In other words, Mondays are not as bad as we may think! 

What do you think? Do you hate Mondays?


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